Hartsdale Pet Cemetery (part 9: More than Cats and Dogs)

Among the tens of thousands of dog and cat remains, Hartsdale is also the final resting place of birds, rabbits, guinea pigs, and more. Apparently there is also a horse and a lion. (I’ve been there three times and have yet to find the lion’s memorial.)

image

image

image

Advertisements

Hartsdale Pet Cemetery (part 8: Together Forever, On Earth as We Are in Heaven)

In 2011, the State of New York decided to ban the burial of human cremains in pet cemeteries, but this ban was lifted this past August. It was a grudging retraction: pet cemeteries are still forbidden from advertising the possibility and from charging a fee (presumably as further disincentive), and must inform prospective purchasers that cremains (in the text of the NYS Register, “cremains” is defined as only human cremated remains) buried in pet cemeteries are not entitled to the same protections as those buried in designated human cemeteries (such as protection from being moved into a mass burial lot in the case of nonpayment, for example).

image

image

image

image

Hartsdale Pet Cemetery (part 5: More Than Human)

Some of the gravestones at the Hartsdale Canine Cemetery use the rhetoric of surrogacy, identifying the non-human animal as, essentially, as good as a human relative—and in some cases, perhaps superior.

image

Next to Larry, the “grandson,” lays Luke, the “son.”

image

“Our Little Man.”

image

In case there was any doubt, yes, I did love my cats more than I loved you.

image

Unabashedly claiming interspecies family.

image

This one is fascinating: Mickey is not a dog; he is merely a boy in dog-face. I hope someone runs across my blog and is inspired to write a whole article about this.

Hartsdale Pet Cemetery (part 4: Almost Human)

Stanley Brandes has written about American pet cemetery gravestones, tracking how they evidence the increasing humanization (my word, not his) of pet animals. As they increasingly were given human names and human religious and ethnic affiliations, their gravestones also reflected the pet’s adoption of their human family’s identity.

image

image

image

I love this: pets so beloved, they emigrated with their humans.

image