“Cruelty to Animals—A Scene in Brooklyn”

(May 7, 1869, The New York Times)

“Yesterday afternoon, as one of the Myrtle-avenue line of cars was making its upward trip, the driver was ordered to halt by a private citizen as he was near the foot of the citizen as he was near the foot of the citizen as he was near the foot of the down-grade at Raymond-street. When the car stopped, the citizen ordered that it should not move until a tow-horse was attached to it. It was not until Sergeant ROGERS, of the Central Police Squad, made his appearance that the citizen exhibited his badge—a Metropolitan Police shield—and made himself known as the agent of the “Society for the Prevention of the Cruelty to Animals.” As the point at which the car was stopped was some distance below the place where the tow-horse is usually attached, a long time elapsed before the car could proceed, and meantime a long train of cars filled with exasperated passengers was collected along the avenue, and a curious crowd had assembled. The Society’s operations were warmly discussed, and declared to be unpopular.”

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